Our Story

ABOUT the theater

The Berwick Theater and Center for Community Arts is a non-profit organization located in downtown Berwick, Pennsylvania. We show first and second run movies in our single screen theater where all of our showings are only $5 per ticket for all ages.

After months of time, hard work, and dedication from our board and volunteers, the BTCCA was able to undergo a much needed renovation. With help from grants, donations, and loans from various entities we were able to upgrade to a digital projector and sound system, install a new screen and new seats, and provide upgrades to our flooring as well.

The BTCCA hosts various events such as our Big Screen Bingo, the Game On video game competition, Rocky Horror Picture Show with shadow cast, and others. In the near future we plan to host various live shows including bands, plays, comedians, and others. 

 

Management

Laura Knorr — Executive Director

Art. Movies. Home. Three things I am passionate about and fortunately, my position as Executive Director of the BTCCA gives the opportunity to share these interests with you and our community. Like many others in my hometown, I've been watching movies at the Berwick Theater since I was a kid and now, with the support of our moviegoers, we are able to continue making memories with new generations. Having had a career as an artist, I am especially excited to help bring every form of art to our theater. And with all the talent in our area, the possibilities are endless! Thanks for joining me and our Board in supporting the Arts and a part of Berwick history and...let's all go to the movies!

Nancy Lynn — Supervisor and Fundraising Events Coordinator

Michele Culver - Supervisor

 

HISTORY of the theater

The actual structure of the Berwick Theater goes back a long way. It was originally built and maintained by the Patriotic Order Sons of America for the intended use as an opera house. In the 1910’s it was renamed the Lyric and later it became the Palace. It’s believed that it was being operated as a playhouse at that time. Records show that it was the Strand in the 1920’s-1930’s and operated as a movie theater. Our patrons tell of silent movies and later popular titles like “Stowaway” with Shirley Temple.

In 1937 there was a devastating fire, but it seems that the Strand was more fortunate than it’s neighboring play house. In 1969 major renovations were made to the theater. It was those renovations that the Berwick Theater still very much resembles. The whole project included fire proof walls, state of the art technology for it’s period, the infamous big screen, and many other upgrades which cost upwards of $90,000 at the time.

Vincent DiAugustine purchased the Berwick Theater in 1971 and maintained operations until his death in July 2013. Since his passing, the theater has been inherited by his grand daughter, Renee Bower (DiAugustine). Over the years, Renee has worked to make the theater a non-profit organization. She also worked tirelessly to form a board of directors full of individuals from varying and useful backgrounds who are extremely passionate about the success of the theater. 

Though changes have been made to the theater over the years, it still exudes a certain character that’s unique to small town theaters nationwide. The theater acts as an anchor for the downtown business community the same way that a multiplex attracts shoppers to a mall. It is part of the character and vitality of the town. 

 

Board of directors

Ginny Crake - President

Wade Perry - Vice President

Renee Bower - Treasurer

Cynthia Lombard - Secretary

Joseph DiAugustine

Jered Gordner, A.A.S., B.S.

Joshua Kishbaugh

Judy Micheletti, M.Ed.

Paul Haden, M.Ed.

Pastor David Kingsborough

Susan Cragle

 

Our Commitment to Vince

The Berwick Theater doesn’t bring in a profit, and hasn’t for a long time. Every cent that comes out of the Berwick Theater, goes right back into it. Vince never cared about a big profit, he just did what he had to so he could keep the lights on. We don’t intend to change any of that. The more profit we bring in, the more money we can put back into the theater.


 
 

Questions?